SUMMARY: AT A GLANCE
---------------------------------------------------------------

1. Node Version Manager on Simple Hosting
2. How to spot slamming emails
3. Recently-Delegated TLDs
4. Gandi Events
5. In-depth: What’s a premium domain?
6. Visualization: Things you can do with a domain name
7. TLD release Calendar
8. Promo Roundup

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If April showers bring May flowers, what do April news items bring? I guess we’ll find out next month.

In any case, this month, we have some great news items with which to shower you. To begin with, on the Simple Hosting front: Node Version Manager (NVM) is now available. We also have a quick reminder about how to tell if the email you received about renewing your domain is really from Gandi or if it’s part of a slamming campaign, and a look at the recently-delegated TLDs.

We also went in depth this month on premium domains and created a visualization about ways to use your domain.

And as always, we end this month’s newsletter with a look at the TLD release calendar for the month of April and a look at new and ongoing promotions.

Pascal at Holberton
Gandi CTO Pascal Bouchareine at Holberton School (also pictured: DNS gods)

 

Node Version Manager on Simple Hosting
---------------------------------------------------------------

Node Version Manager, better known as nvm, is now available on Simple Hosting Node.js. This means you can run any version of Node.js distributed via nvm. You no longer have to limit yourself to the ones pre-installed on your instance.

All you need to do is add a ".nvmrc" file to your project's root directory and deploy your code.

One consequence of this update is that you can now run a parse server to build your own Facebook apps. Read about how to set that up in our wiki.

Read our post for full details on NVM | Back to top

How to spot slamming emails
---------------------------------------------------------------

Over the past month or so, Gandi domain owners have been hit with a wave of slamming emails. These emails pretend to be official notices regarding your domain name registration trying to get you to provide your banking information to a third party.

If you ever get an email like this, remember:

  • Check the sender email address. Gandi reminders come from the address support-renew@gandi.net.
  • Check the recipient address. If you have our anti-spam service activated, your real address will not be available to spammers. Gandi will only contact you at your real address. An email sent to an email address @contact.gandi.net, then, should be suspicious.
  • Check the Messages tab and the Domains page in your Gandi account. If your domain is expired, you’ll see it on your Domains page. If we emailed you, you’ll see it in your Messages tab.
  • Turn on anti-spam in your account management. If your account doesn’t have this feature activated, it’s harder to tell if an email is legitimate.

Find out more about detecting these | Back to top

Recently-Delegated TLDs
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A few of the notable strings added to the root this month (that is, newly-added TLDs) provide a glimpse into some of the factors that ICANN considers when it decides to approve or not approve new gTLD applications. In particular, they shed some light on Community TLDs, Community Objections, and Public Interest Commitments.

Which strings were delegated and what they reveal | Back to top

Gandi Events
---------------------------------------------------------------

This past month, our CTO and VP Pascal visited Holberton School a couple of times and we hosted a UX Speed Dating event at our San Francisco office. Coming up this month, we’ll be hosting another UX Speed Dating event on April 20.

The Root Zone. w/ Dr. Paul Mockapetris, April 12, 2016

And on April 12 we’ll be kicking off our new series about DNS The Root Zone. with CloudFlare at 6:00 pm PDT.

Read all event details | Back to top

In-depth: What’s a premium domain?
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What's a Premium Domain

“This domain name is categorized as ‘Premium’ at the registry.”

Maybe you’ve seen something like this message before at Gandi or another registrar. If you have, you may also have wondered what makes these domains special and why they cost extra.

This month we went in-depth on this topic.

See what we found out about Premium domains | Back to top

Visualization: Things you can do with a domain name
---------------------------------------------------------------

We are continuing our data visualization series this month with a look at a few of the most common and best uses for domain names.

Websites, email, forwading, and money-making: all the things you can do with a domain name

Check out our post for this image | Back to top

TLD release Calendar
---------------------------------------------------------------

Here's a look at TLD releases at Gandi for the month of April 2016:

Tuesday April 5:

.ist (Landrush)

.istanbul (Landrush)

Wednesday April 6:

.store (Sunrise)

Tuesday April 12:

.gmbh (Sunrise)

.ltd (Sunrise)

Thursday April 14:

.promo (Sunrise)

Thursday April 21:

.tube (Sunrise)

Stay tuned for updates and, of course, for next month's releases.

Next | Back to top

Promo Roundup
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We've got some serious, no-fools April promos:

Starting April 1:

.me $4.00 per year through March 14

.live $15.57 per year through June 30

.accountant, .bid, .cricket, .date, .download, .faith, .loan, .party, .racing, .review, .science, .trade, .webcam, .win $2.00 per year through December 31

.site, .website $1.99 through April 30

.mx $16.00 through April 30

.boutique, .immo, .maison, .sarl, .voyage $10.00 through June 30

.mom $1.00 through May 6

 

Ongoing promotions:

.asia 70% off, through March 31

.me $14.40 through December 31

.in $7.75 through June 30

.rocks $7.75 and .social $16.25 through May 31

.link $4.21 and .click $3.62 through June 30

.adult, .porn, .sex, .xxx $12.00 through May 31

.co.com $19.99 through May 31

Back to top

 

That’s all we have in the forecast this month. Stay tuned next month to find out what’s in store for May. See you then!

 

Sincerely,

Gandi.net


The miracle of domain name registration is a magical and sometimes obscure process, but according to our research, the registration and management of a domain name has been found to adhere to a few very precise rules which may seem complicated for some.

Last month we dove into the life and death cycle of a domain name. This month we’re looking into the purpose of that life. Every domain follows its own unique path in life.

These are the things you can do with a domain name.

Things you can do with a Domain Name

We’ve broken it up into four categories: Websites, Email, Forwarding, and Revenue-generating.

Each domain blinks into existence with the dream of becoming a Fully Actualized Domain Name—a mythical beast uniting all these uses—but many, of course, settle happily into their roles as addresses for company websites, URL shorteners, custom emails, or rental properties.

Out of hundreds of millions of domain names in existence and hundreds of millions yet to be born, each domain is special, each can be used in its own unique way. What will you do with yours?


Here's a look at upcoming, ongoing and past events at Gandi.

Pascal at Holberton
Gandi CTO Pascal Bouchareine at Holberton School (also pictured: DNS gods)

The Root Zone.

We like DNS.

That’s why we’re collaborating with Cloudflare on a new Meetup. We’re looking to talk about anything and everything related to DNS and hopefully in the process inspire some new ideas for this backbone system of the Internet.

We also hope to educate the general public on issues as low-level as record types and as complex as DNSSEC.

We’re inviting Network Administrators, Ops, DevOps, Systems Engineers, Internet Enthusiasts, and anyone else who’s interested.

This event is put together by Gandi and Cloudflare and the location will alternate between our San Francisco offices.

The Root Zone.

Our first event will be at the CloudFlare office on April 12 at 6:00 PM. We’ll be hearing from Dr. Paul Mockapetris, the original founder of the Domain Name System (aka DNS).

Paul also built the first ever SMTP server, ran networking at ARPA, served as the chair of the IETF, and is an honored member of the Internet Hall of Fame.

Check the meetup page for more information and updates.

Gandi talks to Holberton School

This past month, CTO and Gandi US VP Pascal Boucheraine visited Holberton School for a couple of talks. One was about DNS, the other was just about Gandi in general.

Holberton <3 @gandibar
Aww thanks Holberton School

Holberton, for those who aren’t aware, isn’t a coding bootcamp or online courses but an alternative to college. It’s based on peer learning and project-based learning and it aims to produce the best of the next generation of full-stack software engineers.

Even cooler, Holberton is all about increasing diversity. They have an automated, software-driven admissions process that has produced a 40% ratio of female students, among other diversity benchmarks.

Pascal Explains things

And the admissions process for their next class of students in October, which is open to everyone 18+ regardless of education and experience, has just opened up. If you're interested, you should apply.

We're looking forward to when we can team up with them again.

Until then, remember to first ask the DNS gods.

UX Speed Dating: User Testing Night

Every third Wednesday we host a User Testing Night at our San Franciso office with the UX Speed Dating meet up group. This is a monthly event, formatted like a speed dating event, where tech professionals get to present a user test to three users for in-person responses.

This month’s event will be April 20 at 6:00 PM PDT.

Check out the specific rules and see the Meetup page or the UX Speed dating site for details.


A few of the notable strings added to the root this month (that is, newly-added TLDs) provide a glimpse into some of the factors that ICANN considers when it decides to approve or not approve new gTLD applications.

 

.tunes — February 25

Amazon’s application for .tunes prevailed against a Community Objection from the American Association of Independent Music. The Community Objection process allows “communities” to file a formal objection with ICANN against a certain application.

In this case, AAIM filed an objection because it felt that it was anti-competitive for Amazon to manage the .tunes TLD.

ICANN’s experts, though, didn’t buy it. To begin with, ICANN found that AAIM couldn’t legitimately claim to represent the entire “tunes” community. In fact, they took issue with the idea that “tunes” is specific enough to qualify as a community.

They also dismissed AAIM’s claims that Amazon would abuse its market power or support pirate networks as “purely speculative.”

 

.passagens and .vuelos — March 2

Passagens is Portuguese for fare or ticket and vuelos is Spanish and Portuguese for flights. In both cases, the application for these TLDs came from Despegar Online SRL, which describes itself as “a branch of the largest online travel agency in Latin America.”

Altogether, Despegar applied for five new TLDs. In addition to these two, they also applied for .hoteles (Spanish for hotels), .hoteis (Portuguese for hotels) and .hotel. All of their applications were met with a GAC objection. Of these, .hoteles was added last June.

Not only can industry groups and other “communities” file objections but so can ICANN’s Governmental Advisory Committee (GAC), which is how world governments provide input into the process.

The objection claimed Despegar’s application was anti-competitive. When a TLD applicant gets a GAC objection, the GAC recommends certain actions to mitigate that. For both .passagens and .vuelos, Despegar was required to “specify transparent criteria for third party access to the TLD.”

 

.gmbh — March 9

For those who are not familiar, GmbH is a German abbreviation for Gesellschaft mit beschränkter Haftung, which is more or less the German equivalent of an LLC. ICANN received numerous applications for this TLD but in the end, Donuts prevailed.

Interestingly, a community TLD application was received for this TLD from TLDDOT GmbH. A Community TLD is a type of TLD ICANN created to allow certain “closely related” communities to opt to manage their own TLDs.

In this case, TLDDOT was created specifically to represent the business community in German-speaking countries. Ultimately, the community TLD application was withdrawn.

However, in the end Donuts was required to add a PIC to their application. A PIC is a Public Interest Commitment. These are ways for ICANN to amend an application to make sure that a registry uses a TLD the way it thinks it should. In this case, the PIC was primarily to make sure that Donuts had a process for limiting registrants to companies who are in fact GmbHs.

 

.stream — March 18

There were two competing applications for this TLD. Last year Famous Four Media beat out Hughes Satellite System Corporation for this TLD when it was put up for auction. Because .stream is obviously oriented towards video streaming services, ICANN required a PIC for this application as well.

This time it wasn’t to ensure registrants were part of a community, as was the case with .gmbh, but to address concerns that .stream would become a hotbed for illegal streaming.

The PIC for .stream includes provisions for an Acceptable Use Policy allowing the registry to quickly lock down and revoke registration of any abusers. It also includes a “Rights Protection Mechanism,” which commits Famous Four Media to make abuse prevention one of it’s “core objectives.”

You can keep track of future developments on this page from ICANN.

Remember: these are new TLDs on the cutting edge of having been added by ICANN. As such, any discussion of one of these TLDs should not be interpreted as meaning any of these extensions will be imminently available on Gandi (though we, of course, try to offer all the extensions we possibly can).


“This domain name is categorized as ‘Premium’ at the registry.”

Maybe you’ve seen something like this message before at Gandi or another registrar. If you have, you may also have wondered what makes these domains special and why they cost extra.

The concept of a “Premium” domain applies primarily to the field of new gTLDs. Within the space of a little over a year, around 900 new extensions have been added to the once relatively narrow band of “classic” TLDs (you know, like .com, .net, .org …). The result has been a steady multiplication of the number of available domain names.

One consequence of this flourishing domain name market has been that it is now possible to replicate the same name across hundreds of extensions (think of how many Google must own). It’s now also possible to choose an extension that matches a special area of interest or a particular commercial market. Take .beer or .archi, which primarily focus on beer and architecture (all you need in life, really).

It’s important to note, however, that each extension is not created equal. They are each managed by a different registry. Some large registries like Donuts manage hundreds of extensions. Other registries like dotStrategy were created specifically to manage a single extension. In this case .buzz.

Not every domain name is equal either. Some domain names have a much higher probability of being popular (or have a higher market value if you prefer). Kind of like search engine keywords.

Trademark Clearinghouse (TMCH) keeps a database of registered trademarks. Obviously, terms stored there are likely to generate higher demand. In general, though, we are talking about easily-recognizable and memorizable domain names. Or ones that have optimum SEO.

Some are generic. Others, like englishmuffins.cooking, teahupoo.surf (it’s a famous Tahitian wave), or royals.london are especially valuable only in conjunction with particular extensions. The domain name romance.bets isn’t terribly attractive, but romance.online is quite the catch.

The registries of these new extensions, then, have a set of unique challenges. How can they ensure an orderly roll-out of these high-value domain names? This doesn’t just mean managing competing purchases (generally domains are registered on a first-come-first-served basis). It also includes keeping out domain squatters, especially on domains corresponding to brand names.

Most of these registries are also commercial entities. They’re also motivated to take advantage of the high demand in these domain names.

One solution to the problem is to auction off domains to the highest bidder during the Landrush phase or Early Access Period.

The other option is to make certain domains “Premium” . But it’s not actually a uniform solution. Some registries make all their Premium domains open to all (again, generally first-come-first-served). Others have eligibility requirements. These can range from a statement of motivation and the registrant’s “good faith" to a complete business plan.

There are also several ways of pricing Premium domains. Some registries have complicated hierarchies of Premium domains. Afilias ( .blue, .vote, .rich, and .porn among others), for example, has eight categories of Premium domains.

Approaches to pricing can vary too. Large registries often prefer a finely tuned machine that hones in on that sweet spot on the supply-and-demand curve that gives optimal ROI. Small registries might release their extensions in the GoLive phase without designating any domains as Premium. Then, when they have the budget to do some research on the topic, they add domains to their premium list.

Likewise, compiling lists of Premium domains varies widely as well. To determine what domains are likely to be popular, registries sometimes monitor social media (like in the case of United TLD, the registry for .ninja domains). They might use search-engine history and traffic or even sales history of the classic TLDs like .com. One thing that’s relatively consistent, though, is that the secret sauce and the list itself is rarely made public.

So, what it all means is sometimes when you’re looking for a domain, you might find that it’s Premium. But “Premium” doesn’t always mean “prohibitively expensive.” For example, sql.agency and pop.solutions are two premium domains under $50.

And, it’s important to note, your domain might not be Premium at all. If you’re a small business and your company name isn’t super generic and isn’t another brand name, it probably isn't.

Or maybe, if you find out you can’t register a particular domain, your domain is actually “reserved.” It’s important to make the distinction.

A Premium domain would likely be at the top of the list of domains a registry would like to see registered. A registry’s list of reserved domains however are the ones they don’t want to open up to the public.

This can be for moral and political reasons to potential liability or even vanity. The domain rob.sucks, for example, is a reserved domain because the CEO of the .sucks registry is Rob Hall.

So be sure to note whether the domain you want is actually “reserved,” or if it’s “Premium.”

Which brings us back to:

“This domain name is categorized as ‘Premium’ at the registry.”

What should you do with this message? If you can register it online, then you should see the Premium price right next to. But sometimes you’ll need to contact our Customer care team to find out what the Premium price is. You may also want to ask if the extension has particular eligibility requirements. If you don’t want to pay the Premium price, try a different iteration of your domain name. If a domain name sounds like it’s Premium, it probably is.


SUMMARY: AT A GLANCE
---------------------------------------------------------------

1. Recently-Added TLDs to the Root
2. Gandi Events
3. Update: One-click upgrade to PHP 5.6
4. In-depth: The Lifecycle of a Domain
5. Tech Fundamentals: IANA
6. TLD release Calendar
7. Promo Roundup

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It’s March and that fresh, clean Spring air is coaxing the buds on the trees to open up and cover the branches with soft, green spring leaves. That Spring air seems to have even blown through this month’s newsletter. At least, a crop of fresh, green updates, promos, and new releases are budding.

This month, we’re looking at new TLDs being added by ICANN to the root zone, Gandi is attending and hosting a flurry of events, you can upgrade your Simple Hosting instance to PHP 5.6 with one click and witness the lifecycle of a domain in one glance. We’re also looking into a little bit of Internet history with this month’s Tech fundamental on IANA. And of course we’ve got some great new releases and promos this month, so don’t miss those calendars either.

LAUNCH 2016 stage
LAUNCH Fest 2016, see events for more

Recently-Added TLDs to the Root
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We took a look at the TLDs coming down the line that were just added to ICANN in the past month. We won’t necessary end up offering all of them, but we thought you’d at least like to know.

Read more | Next | Back to top

Gandi Events
---------------------------------------------------------------

This month we attended, are attending and even hosted a number of events, whether in Paris, San Francisco, Luxembourg, Taipei or beyond.

Hyperloop at Launch


Read more | Next | Back to top

Update: One-click upgrade to PHP 5.6
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A one-click upgrade to PHP 5.6 for Simple Hosting instances is now available in Beta.

All you need to do is go to your instance’s control panel and click on the “Update” link.

Read more | Next | Back to top

In-depth: The Lifecycle of a Domain
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We’re also starting a new series of infographics exploring the mysterious recesses of domain name registration, hosting, the Internet as a whole.

This month, we are delving into the life and death of a domain name: from the moment it is first registered and blinks into existence, to its renewal, and then to the mysterious afterlife that lies beyond expiration.

Lifecycle of a Domain

Read more | Next | Back to top

Tech Fundamentals: IANA
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In March 1972, Jon Postel along with Vint Cerf called for the creation of a catalog of socket numbers. The purpose was to create, essentially, a list of all the existing codes and numbering systems allowing computers to network with each other. This was the first step on a road that led to IANA, ICANN’s numbers and names authority.

Read more | Next | Back to top

TLD release Calendar
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Open in new tab

Here's a look at TLD releases at Gandi for the month of March 2016:

Thursday March 3:

.bet (GoLive)

Monday March 7:

.佛山 (.xn--1qqw23a // Foshan GeoTLD) (GoLive)

Tuesday March 8:

.bible (GoLive)

Thursday March 10:

.vip (Sunrise)

Monday March 21:

.barcelona (GoLive)

Stay tuned for updates and, of course, for next month's releases.

Next | Back to top

Promo Roundup
---------------------------------------------------------------

Open in new tab

We've got a healthy early spring harvest of promotions this March. Take a look below :

Starting Tuesday March 1:

.me $4.00 per year through March 14

Super Tuesday: .democrat, .republican, ($25.00 per year) .vote  and .voto ($50.00 per year) through March 7

.cloud $9.00 per year through December 31

.club 50% off through March 31

.co.com $19.99 per year through May 31

.online $4.99 per year through March 31

Spring has sprung: .xxx, .porn, .sex, and .adult $12.00 per year through May 31

 

Starting Monday March 7:

St. Patrick's Day Promo: .pub $7.00 per year through March 18

 

Ongoing promotions:

.asia 70% off, through March 31

Back to top

Well, that's all for this month. Don’t hesitate to drop us a line with your impressions and feedback on any of our services or our newsletter. We’d love to hear from you.

Otherwise, see you in April.


In March 1972, Jon Postel along with Vint Cerf called for the creation of a catalog of socket numbers. The purpose was to create, essentially, a list of all the existing codes and numbering systems allowing computers to network with each other.

Postel was editor of the Request for Comment (RFC) document series in which this call and the resultant catalog were published. In it he dubbed himself the “czar of the socket numbers,” in December 1972 when the catalog was complete.

This role as “czar” became a permanent function. He took it with him when he earned his Ph.D. from UCLA and moved to the University of Southern California’s Informational Sciences Institute (USC/ISI). There, he brought on-board Joyce Reynolds, a graduate student.  The two of them became the “Internet Assigned Numbers Authority,” or IANA.

IANA then collaborated with Elizabeth Feinler from Stanford and the rest of Stanford Research Institute’s Network Information Center (SRI-NIC) to maintain, more or less, a directory for the Internet.

When a new host joined the network, they would email Feinler. Feinler would then add them to a HOSTS.TXT file sent out and installed manually on every networked machine. When domain names were invented, the task shifted to adding strings to the root name server.

In 1990, NIC's function was contractually shifted to Network Solutions, a private company. In 1995, they received authorization from the National Science Foundation to charge a fifty-dollar fee per year on domain name registration. This move caused widespread dissatisfaction with Network Solution’s concentration of power and money. The researchers who had been contracted to create the Internet were especially critical.

It wasn’t until January 28, 1998 that this conflict came to a head. On that day, Postel made history. He emailed eight of the twelve operators of the Internet’s regional root nameservers and told them to change their root zone servers from Network Solutions’s A.ROOT-SERVERS.NET to IANA’s DNSROOT.IANA.ORG. The operators made the switch. This "test" demonstrated that the ultimate control of the root zone belonged to IANA and not Network Solutions.

This led directly to the Clinton administration’s creation of ICANN to take control of the IANA function. Despite being told by presidential science advisor Ira Magaziner that he would “never work on the Internet again,” Postel was set to become ICANN's first chair.

Sadly, Postel died before ICANN was realized, and it was Joyce Reynolds who managed the transition of the IANA function from USC/ISI to ICANN.  Ostel’s old colleague Steve Crocker who took the role of first ICANN chair. Postel is memorialized in RFC 2468: “I remember IANA.”

Reynolds passed away more recently, just this December, but hers and Postel’s legacy lives on. Their contribution can be seen not only in the numerous technical documents they authored and co-authored. They are also visible in principles like “rough consensus” and “Postel’s law” which states a fundamental rule of networking: “Be liberal in what you accept and conservative in what you send.”


Here's a look at upcoming, ongoing and past events at and away from Gandi recently.

Events at Gandi

UX Speed Dating: User Testing Night

Every third Wednesday, Gandi hosts a User Testing Night with the UX Speed Dating meet up group at our San Francisco offices. The last one we hosted was February 17 and we’ll be hosting again on March 16.

This is a chance for tech professionals who want to have some software or device or concept tested to present any sort of product to three users for preliminary, in-person feedback.

The owners of the products sit in a single place and then the users rotate between them every 20 minutes or so.

Check out the specific rules here and see the Meetup page here or the UX Speed dating site.

The Root Zone.

We'd like to invite DNS nerds and DNS newbs alike to check out a new series we intend to launch shortly titled The Root Zone. We'll be kicking this series off sometime in early April (though we don't have specific dates set yet). Watch the meetup page for information and updates, though.

Gandi (re)fait le .point

On February 18 at the co-working space Le Tank, Paris 11, we held the third annual “Gandi (re)fait le .point,” event, a punny name for our conference about how to best leverage new gTLDs.

For those interested, the 2016 edition of our white book on the topic is available (in French) here.

Events Outside of Gandi

Hyperloop at Launch
Hyperloop at Launch Fest. See below for more about LAUNCH

M3AAWG 36

This last month we were guests at M3AAWG in San Francisco. M3AAWG, for those unaware of the organization, stands for Message, Malware, Mobile Anti-Abuse Working Group, and it is one of the foremost abuse and security conferences.

Just like Fight Club and Las Vegas, communication about M3AAWG publicly is prohibited, so, suffice it to say that if you want to know more about what we were up to there, check out M3AAWG’s website.

ICANN 55

We also just attended ICANN55 in Marrakech. ICANN is the one organization which is perhaps the most relevant to what Gandi does (i.e. domain name registration), so not only is it a venue to connect with the organization in charge of almost everything we do as a registrar, but it’s also an excellent opportunity to connect with others involved in domain name registration.

AsiaBSDCon 2016

From March 10-13, 2016, Gandi will be in Tokyo at the Tokyo University of Science for AsiaBSDCon 2016.

So what is AsiaBSDCon? It’s a technical conference that aims to collect the best technical presentations and papers to share with the widest possible audience. This includes basically anybody who develops, deploys or uses systems based on any BSD operating system, including FreeBSD, NetBSD, OpenBSD, DragonFlyBSD, Darwin and MacOS X. 

LAUNCH Festival 2016

 

Launch 2016

Having an office is downtown San Francisco has exposed us to the large and very active world of entrepreneurship, innovation, and creativity. And what is it that every new idea should have? A domain name. No, seriously. Whether you have a completely built out website, a "coming soon" landing page, or even just an email address with your company's name on it, it shows that you're in the business of making your dreams come true. And THAT is what LAUNCH festival was all about. We caught some speeches, fireside chats, panels, and presentations that were not only inspiring but jaw-dropping. Not to mention 150 startups pitching their ideas back to back to back to back. Hats off to them! 


Here's a look at TLD releases at Gandi for the month of March 2016:

Thursday March 3:

.bet (GoLive)

Monday March 7:

.佛山 (.xn--1qqw23a // Foshan GeoTLD) (GoLive)

Tuesday March 8:

.bible (GoLive)

Thursday March 10:

.vip (Sunrise)

Monday March 21:

.barcelona (GoLive)

 

Stay tuned for updates and, of course, for next month's releases.


We've got a healthy early spring harvest of promotions this March. Take a look below:

 

Starting Tuesday March 1:

.me $4.00 per year through March 14

Super Tuesday: .democrat, .republican, ($25.00 per year) .vote  and .voto ($50.00 per year) through March 7

.cloud $9.00 per year through December 31

.club 50% off through March 31

.co.com $19.99 per year through May 31

.online $4.99 per year through March 31

Spring has sprung: .xxx, .porn, .sex, and .adult $12.00 per year through May 31

 

Starting Monday March 7:

St. Patrick's Day Promo: .pub $7.00 per year through March 18

 

Ongoing promotions:

.asia 70% off, through March 31


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