Whether it’s .live in front of a .studio audience or recorded for .video later, from July 1 through September 30, 2016 at 5:00 PM PDT, it’s show time. And by that we mean, they're half-off on the first year.

In other words, .live domains (normally $31.15 per year at A rates) will be just $15.57.studio domains (normally $31.15 per year at A rates) will be only $15.57 and .video domains will be just $14.41 (normally $28.83 per year at A rates).

Register a domain under one of these TLDs?:

.tld

Every year the holiday gift-giving season starts earlier and earlier. This year, it seems it’s starting already in July. At least as far as Radix Registry domains are concerned.

From July 1 until December 31, 2016, Radix has a little gift for us all: a huge holiday promotion on all eight of their TLDs :

  • .online just $3.99 per year instead of $29.99.
  • .press just $9.99 per year rather than $94.97 normally.
  • .website only $0.99 per year, compared to $30.31.
  • .site $1.99 per year, normally $34.87.
  • .host only just $10.99 per year, ordinarily $124.93.
  • .space $0.99 per year rather than $12.97.
  • .pw $0.89 per year, compared with $15.00 normally.
  • .tech just $3.99 per year, rather than $60.79.

All of which would make perfect stocking stuffers.

You know, it’s not so bad for the holidays to start this early when you’re one of the ones getting the gifts.

Register a domain under one of these TLDs?:

.tld

Exclusivity is a big part of what makes a club a club and .club itself involves a layer of exclusivity: certain highly desirable .club domains have been long locked away in the registry's virtual vaults as reserved domains. If you've eyed these domains from afar, we have good news for you. The .club registry is currently releasing some 12,000 previously reserved domains as premium domains. And there are some great ones still available, like dvd.club ($2000), village.club ($2000) and runner.club ($7500).

But, because you’re part of a great exclusive group yourself (by that we mean Gandiens), we’re giving you an exclusive chance to register any of these 12,000 new premium .club domains. With the following code, get 25% off the premium domain of your choice for the first year:

CLUB25

The code is valid from July 1 to July 31, 2016 (at midnight UTC), and premium domains are in high demand, so don’t delay.

Register a .club?

.club


 


We assure you, this post contains no horrific-sounding portmanteaus about contentious referendums. And the only argument—economic or otherwise—we’re going to make here goes like this:

From 1 July to 31 July (midnight to midnight UTC), domain name creations for .eu domains will be half-price. That means €6.00, £5.00 or, if you’re so inclined, $7.50.

Get a .eu?

.eu

 


The doors are open to brand and trademark owners to register a .shop domain in the Sunrise phase today, June 30, 2016 as of 8:00 AM PDT. Domains can be purchased in the Sunrise phase for $1050.74 per year at A rates until August 30, 2016.

Then, for four days only, from September 22 until 26 at 8:00 AM, you have a chance to snatch up a .shop domain for $174.60 in the Landrush phase, and take it off the shelf for possible competition once .shop enters GoLive.

Finally, on September 26, also at 8:00 AM PDT, .shop becomes available to all in the GoLive phase for just $45.95 per year at A rates. Even if you don’t have a trademark registered with TMCH, you can still nonetheless pre-register a domain in the GoLive phase while the Sunrise and Landrush phases are ongoing.

So whether you have a Pop-up or a Mom-and-Pop, now’s the time to get your .shop.

Get a .shop?

.shop

 


In October 2013, ICANN launched the new generic top-level domains (nTLDs) program. Now, less than three years later, more than a thousand new TLDs have been delegated, 999 of them active.

While it massively increases the online name space and choices for would-be domain name registrants, this preponderance of choices can also be daunting, even threatening. Especially for those concerned with issues of intellectual property and trademark owners, for whom the incredible increase of new TLDs means extra hassle at the least or in the worst case, added budgetary strain, even to the point of unattainably high expense.

At the same time, the standard advice is nonetheless to “defend your territory,” when a new extension has to do with an area of commerce or a type of service that may be associated with your business, and that requires keeping up with new extensions being added and their release schedules.

In that light, we’d like to give you the tools to keep on top of developments, including some facts and figures and best practices to adopt.

 

2016: A Turning Point 

The months of May and June 2016 saw us hit two significant numbers: the 1000th nTLD was released in May and the milestone of 20 million registered nTLD domains was passed at the beginning June (thanks notably to a huge promotion on .xyz). For comparison, this number was only at 11 million in January this year and as of this writing, a little more than 126 million .com domain names have been registered. Of course, .com is by far the most popular gTLD, so here are some additional figures for a few other extensions to help give an idea of the numbers at play:

.net = 16.2 million domains

.cn = 18.6 million domains

.fr = 2.9 million domains

.ru = 5.1 million domains

.pe = 90,000 domains

So, in other words, hitting that 20 million mark means more domains are registered under the entire nTLD program than under .net or .cn alone, both of which figure amongst the most popular TLDs out there. Another indicator of the strength of the new TLDs is the fact that .xyz—the most popular of the nTLDs—now has more registrations (6 million) than either .info (5.6 million), .ru or .fr. That’s the first time either one of the “classic” gTLDs or any of the ccTLDs (country-specific TLDs) have been surpassed by any extension in the nTLD program. That’s a stand-out achievement that ought to be appreciated.

 

Keeping watch

For now, it’s true, most new TLDs even the popular ones like .xyz are not well-known by the general public and talk of new TLDs remains largely within the confines of domain name professionals while occasionally being the subject of in-jokes on Silicon Valley or other tech-savvy media. But given the rapid and continued growth of the nTLD program, it’s likely that these extensions will be of increasing importance in the near future. We expect developments like the Internet of Things, which will likely bring a large number of previously-unconnected objects into the public namespace, the transition to IPv6, or the inevitable expansion of online services and of course the eventual depletion of desirable .com domains that will go along with all of these trends to raise the profile of nTLDs drastically over the coming months and years.

In years past, in order to protect a trademark, a brand name or the name of a particular product or service online, in the namespace, it was enough just to consider the countries where you would intended to do business when going beyond the classic gTLDs of .com, .net, .org, .info and .biz. But now it’s becoming more and more necessary to also take into account the possible existence, at present or in the future, of a TLD specifically intended for your particular area of business. This is a blessing for your marketing team, but a potential headache for anyone protecting their intellectual property.

While ICANN does have mechanisms in place (UDRP, USR) to protect against illegitimate usage of a domain name that might be associated with your company or trademark. But these procedures are time-consuming, somewhat onerous, and generally only after the fact.

At the beginning of 2015, it was reported that the number of UDRP complaints for domains in the nTLD program were fifteen times greater than the number of complaints for domains in the “classic” gTLDs. This tends to support the conclusion that cybersquatting on new gTLDs is rampant and encroachment on intellectual property is a serious concern.

Not to disparage any one group over another, these encroachments tend to originate, geographically-speaking, from China: sedo.com, one of the primary marketplaces for domain name resale, estimates that 54% of new registrations are by Chinese citizens. Of course, China has a large population, many of whom are enthusiastic supporters of new technology, but nonetheless cybersquatting looms large among many of these new registrations.

The best protection is defensive registration, that is, registering a domain relevant to your business before a cybersquatter does.

That’s why we suggest regularly checking our site for updates to keep up to date on new releases that might prove essential to your business.

 

Big brands lead the way

Many of you have probably seen that Canon recently began redirecting their corporate domain name canon.com to the domain name global.canon. This is also a significant turning point for the new TLD program, especially for brand TLDs (also called .brand domains). What’s interesting there is the logic behind Canon’s decision to launch it’s own TLD. On its site in its announcement, Canon explains its decision largely in terms of trust:

"Since “.canon” is a domain name that can only be used by the Canon Group, users of “.canon” sites can be assured that the information they are receiving is reliable. In order to ensure that customers can safely access Canon information beyond the global site, the Company also plans to extend the “.CANON” domain name to other Canon Group sites. (http://global.canon/en/about/dotcanon/)".

Another notable example is the .leclerc TLD, which has been used by the French retailer E.LeClerc when they launched their new car rental service at location.leclerc. This extension is also interesting because the brand name, E.Leclerc itself contains a dot, so now that it has exclusive rights to .leclerc it is free to use e.leclerc as its primary website address.

Other notable organizations to make use of .brand domains include Barclay’s (home.barclays), BNP Paribas (mabanque.bnpparibas) and even the CERN laboratory (home.cern). While getting a whole TLD to oneself is generally not feasible for smaller businesses (an application for a new TLD usually runs about $15,000), as .brand TLDs continue to pop up, other new gTLDs will begin to share in some of the limelight.

And some prominent brands are already opting to register domains in new gTLDs outside of .brands. Here are a few notable examples:

 

  • abc.xyz (Registered by Google’s parent company: Alphabet). Google’s registration of this domain alone may in fact be one of the main drivers of .xyz’s popularity.
  • ebay.car
  • london.film
  • ism.golf
  • elle.men
  • parliament.scot
  • fcbarcelona.soccer
  • audacity.space
  • valenciaopen.tennis

 

Many companies use domains registered under a new extension to redirect traffic to their main site, a bit like a shortcut. For example, carlsberg.beer, web.foundation, oxfam.go or disney.tickets.

E-commerce sites also often use new TLDs as a link to a predefined search. Take, for example, Amazon’s registration of the domain book.horse (possible horse_ebooks reference?) which redirects to the results page of an Amazon search for books about horses. The domain video.support redirects to an Amazon search on home theater systems, deal.tires redirects to the search results for tires, and amazon.video to Amazon’s video streaming service.

 

A second round in the works

The question of a second round of new gTLD applications has been in the air since the first round finished (even a bit before, really). This second round is likely to attract a lot more .brand seekers (though the price is likely to be prohibitive, as mentioned above).

And while rumors have long run rampant (this is the internet after all), ICANN hasn’t indicated any potential date yet, but it’s all but certain that nothing will happen until at least 2018 at the very earliest.

Some large brands have already started to show their interest in a second round, notably Twitter (both for a potential .twitter TLD as well as to get in the registry game as well), often with the security as a primary justification. Stephen Coates, Associate director of Trademarks, Domain names and marketing at twitter, has made clear that he believes in the need for improvements to ensure greater rights protection and that the next round should also make a greater distinction between generic TLDs and brand TLDs.

Meanwhile, over the past few months, ICANN has been studying the first round of nTLDs to help identify some of the shortcomings and improve the mechanism for the second round. The two main points they’re looking at are the effect of new extensions on consumers in terms of choices and competition and the mechanisms of rights management. Some of the points ICANN has been looking into is whether to standardize the Sunrise phase to 60 days, reforming the TMCH (trademark clearinghouse), pricing guidelines and possible restrictions for Premium domains, and the option for registries to arbitrarily reserve domains when the TLD is launched in order to put them on the market at a later point.

Essentially, they’re looking into all the various non-standardized aspects of rolling out a new TLD. Every actor in the market, whether registrars, trademark owners, registries or resellers have a stake in avoiding some of the stickier problems that came up in the first round of releases, especially when it comes to protecting intellectual property and preventing abuse.

Finally, it’s foreseeable that the control mechanisms, such as the DPML put in place by Donuts, will be required across the board. These controls seem to have been highly successful with rights owners and many are lobbying ICANN to enlarge these types of mechanisms and possibly mandate them in the future.

 

Whatever the outcome may be, if you need help navigating your way through registering a domain under a new gTLD—including when it comes to strategizing to protect your intellectual property rights—please do not hesitate to contact Gandi Corporate. We would be more than happy to be your guides.


Popular science articles and cats are a match made in internet heaven.

For example, a study extracting data on 4,435 Americans aged 30-75, from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Study found that cat owners showed a 30% lower risk of death from heart attack.

Or, if you prefer, cat purrs, which vibrate at a range of 20-140 Hz, are medically therapeutic, lowering stress, strengthening bones, and decreasing symptoms of Dyspnoea.

The science is still out, but owning a .cat domain might just be as healthful as owning a cat. And now’s the perfect time to test that hypothesis because .cat domains from June 27 through August 31, 2016 at 11:59 PM UTC (that’s 5:00 PM PDT) are $5.00 per year.

Remember: .cat is actually for Catalonia, so if you have a .cat domain, your site has to have at least one page in Catalan, but that doesn’t stop your site from being devoted to cats.

Adopt a .cat?

.cat

We live in a time when an ever-growing proportion of the population carries devices around in its collective pockets capable of capturing and transmitting audio and visual information with a stunning degree of clarity with few barriers to access.

This opens the world to the minutiae of our mundane lives, interesting thoughts or information, and even footage that is shocking or documents events of interest that may not make it through the editorial filters of the mainstream media, for better or for worse.

Protests in Tahrir Square were live-streamed, innumerable political rallies this campaign season were too and so was the sit-in by House Democrats for gun control this month. It’s clear, though, that the power of streaming is not yet fully realized.

So given the raw, untapped power of streaming, it’s exciting news that .stream will enter the GoLive phase on June 28, 2016 at 5:00 PM PDT. The normal price per year at A rates for .stream domains will be $38.31 but from now until December 31, 2016 you can register a .stream domain (or pre-register before it enters GoLive) for just $2.00 per year.

What will you .stream?

.stream


If you live in Europe, you have probably not been able to escape this event, which has united tens of thousands of supporters around 22 athletes who fight over a ball in one of the largest stadiums in France: The European Football Cup.

Driven by the enthusiasm of some football fans at Gandi, we have concocted a promo for the extensions of qualifying countries, which will change depending on the results of the matches: from 15% off for the teams that make it to the 8th finals to 35% off for finalists.

Whether or not you are a fervent follower of each and every match, or totally uninterested in this event, you can take advantage of these promos from 23 June to 10 July, the date of the final, for domain creations at A rates.

 

[EDIT] On June 28th, the countries and extensions that have qualified for the quarter finals, and can therefore benefit from this 25% off promo are:

  • Belgium - .BE
  • France - .FR
  • Germany - .DE
  • Iceland - .IS*
  • Italy - .IT
  • Poland - .PL
  • Portugal - .PT
  • Wales - .WALES

The extensions of the countries eliminated in the previous round will remain 15% off until July 10th, the date of the grand finale.

Of course, since these are geographic extensions (ccTLD), some registration conditions may apply. To see what these may be, check the information page associated with each extension (click the link in the list above). Please also note that if you want to register one of the extensions marked by *, you must first subscribe to our Corporate offer.


This one goes out to all you companies out there.

We see you, sweating and working over there in that office park. Or downtown business district. We see you making value, paying employees, providing services, pleasing customers.

And now we’ve got something for you. On June 22, 2016 at 9:00 AM PDT two new gTLDs that are for those companies out there, working hard for the stakeholders—.ltd and .gmbh—are entering the GoLive phase.

That means domains in these two TLDs are now open to everyone. For .ltd, which now will be available for $25.24 per year at A rates, that means everyone-everyone. For .gmbh, which will now be available for $38.65 per year at A rates, you have to have your existence as a Gesellschaft mit besechränkter Haftung (if you don’t know what that means, sorry .gmbh is not for you) validated with the respective authorities in Austria, Germany, Liechtenstein or Switzerland.

Either way, companies, we know you never take a break, but now you're getting one with .ltd and .gmbh.

This one goes out to you.

Register a domain under one of these TLDs?:

.tld

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